First Mate Cat Food Reviews


WET
Go to Chicken
Go to Chicken & Rice
Go to Chicken & Wild Tuna
Go to Salmon
Go to Salmon & Rice
Go to Salmon & Wild Tuna
Go to Tuna
Go to Turkey
Go to Turkey & Rice
Go to Turkey & Wild Tuna
DRY
Go to Cat & Kitten Formula
Go to Chicken Meal With Blueberries
Go to Classic Formula – Super Premium
Go to Indoor Cat Formula
Go to Pacific Ocean Fish Meal With Blueberries


First Mate
Chicken

 

Ingredients

Boneless chicken, Water sufficient for processing, Potato, Calcium Carbonate, Sodium Chloride, Dicalcium Phosphate, Minerals (Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Iodine), Vitamins (Niacin, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine mononitrate, D-pantothenic Acid, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin A Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Kale

First 5 ingredients

Deboned Chicken - Meat, and skin without the bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Potatoes - A grain-less carbohydrate. Often used in grain free formulas because they are easier to digest than grains. Also used as a bulking agent. An overall filler ingredient.

Calcium Carbonate – An acceptable form of calcium supplementation in the food.

Sodium Chloride – Another name for salt. Salt in cat food is not bad. The problem is there is no maximum allowed quantity.

Ingredients to Point Out

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Overall Score


First Mate
Chicken & Rice

 

Ingredients

Boneless Chicken, Water sufficient for processing, Rice, Calcium Carbonate, Sodium Chloride, Dicalcium Phosphate, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Kale, Minerals: (Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Iodine), Vitamins: (Niacin, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine mononitrate, D-pantothenic Acid, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin A Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Blueberries, Raspberries, Cranberries, Carrots.

First 5 ingredients

Deboned Chicken - Meat, and skin without the bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Rice – A cereal grain that provides little to no nutrition in cat food, yet is very popular to add in cat food.

Calcium Carbonate – An acceptable form of calcium supplementation in the food.

Sodium Chloride – Another name for salt. Salt in cat food is not bad. The problem is there is no maximum allowed quantity.

Ingredients to Point Out

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Fruits - Fruits are added to make the food appear healthier. While ingredients such as blueberries, apples, bananas, etc. look good in cat food the truth is they are unnecessary. It is just as likely they won't provide any additonal benefits..

Carrots – A vegetable that is known for being rich in beta-carotene, a vitamin A source. Cats can absorb the beta-carotene but they cannot convert it to vitamin A. This defeats the purpose of this ingredient in cat food.

Overall Score


First Mate
Chicken & Wild Tuna

 

Ingredients

Boneless chicken, Deboned Tuna, Water sufficient for processing, Potato, Calcium Carbonate, Sodium Chloride, Dicalcium Phosphate, Minerals (Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Iodine), Vitamins (Niacin, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine mononitrate, D-pantothenic Acid, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin A Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Kale

First 5 ingredients

Deboned Chicken - Meat, and skin without the bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein.

Deboned Tuna – Tuna without bones is present in this cat food.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Potatoes - A grain-less carbohydrate. Often used in grain free formulas because they are easier to digest than grains. Also used as a bulking agent. An overall filler ingredient.

Calcium Carbonate – An acceptable form of calcium supplementation in the food.

Ingredients to Point Out

Fish/Seafood - Fish have elevated levels of mercury. Feeding a cat fish every now and then is okay. Long term exposure to fish will cause health problems. Also, the majority of the time fish used for pet food is rank and of poor quality. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption'. This applies to seafood as well.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Overall Score


First Mate
Salmon

 

Ingredients

Boneless/Skinless Salmon, Water sufficient for processing, Potato, Calcium Carbonate, Sodium Chloride, Dicalcium Phosphate, Minerals (Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Iodine), Vitamins (Niacin, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine mononitrate, D-pantothenic Acid, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin A Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Kale

First 5 ingredients

Boneless/Skinless Salmon – Salmon without the bones and skin is present in this cat food.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Potatoes - A grain-less carbohydrate. Often used in grain free formulas because they are easier to digest than grains. Also used as a bulking agent. An overall filler ingredient.

Calcium Carbonate – An acceptable form of calcium supplementation in the food.

Sodium Chloride – Another name for salt. Salt in cat food is not bad. The problem is there is no maximum allowed quantity.

Ingredients to Point Out

Fish/Seafood - Fish have elevated levels of mercury. Feeding a cat fish every now and then is okay. Long term exposure to fish will cause health problems. Also, the majority of the time fish used for pet food is rank and of poor quality. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption'. This applies to seafood as well.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Overall Score


First Mate
Salmon & Rice

 

Ingredients

Boneless/skinless Salmon, Water sufficient for processing, Rice, Calcium Carbonate, Sodium Chloride, Dicalcium Phosphate, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Kale, Minerals: (Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Iodine), Vitamins: (Niacin, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine mononitrate, D-pantothenic Acid, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin A Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Blueberries, Raspberries, Cranberries, Carrots.

First 5 ingredients

Boneless/Skinless Salmon – Salmon without the bones and skin is present in this cat food.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Rice – A cereal grain that provides little to no nutrition in cat food, yet is very popular to add in cat food.

Calcium Carbonate – An acceptable form of calcium supplementation in the food.

Sodium Chloride – Another name for salt. Salt in cat food is not bad. The problem is there is no maximum allowed quantity.

Ingredients to Point Out

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Fruits - Fruits are added to make the food appear healthier. While ingredients such as blueberries, apples, bananas, etc. look good in cat food the truth is they are unnecessary. It is just as likely they won't provide any additonal benefits..

Carrots – A vegetable that is known for being rich in beta-carotene, a vitamin A source. Cats can absorb the beta-carotene but they cannot convert it to vitamin A. This defeats the purpose of this ingredient in cat food.

Overall Score


First Mate
Salmon & Wild Tuna

 

Ingredients

Boneless/Skinless Salmon, Deboned Tuna, Water sufficient for processing, Potato, Calcium Carbonate, Sodium Chloride, Dicalcium Phosphate, Minerals (Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Iodine), Vitamins (Niacin, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine mononitrate, D-pantothenic Acid, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin A Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Kale

First 5 ingredients

Boneless/Skinless Salmon – Salmon without the bones and skin is present in this cat food.

Deboned Tuna – Tuna without bones is present in this cat food.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Potatoes - A grain-less carbohydrate. Often used in grain free formulas because they are easier to digest than grains. Also used as a bulking agent. An overall filler ingredient.

Calcium Carbonate – An acceptable form of calcium supplementation in the food.

Ingredients to Point Out

Fish/Seafood - Fish have elevated levels of mercury. Feeding a cat fish every now and then is okay. Long term exposure to fish will cause health problems. Also, the majority of the time fish used for pet food is rank and of poor quality. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption'. This applies to seafood as well.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Overall Score


First Mate
Tuna

 

Ingredients

Deboned Tuna, Water sufficient for processing, Potato, Calcium Carbonate, Sodium Chloride, Dicalcium Phosphate, Minerals (Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Iodine), Vitamins (Niacin, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine mononitrate, D-pantothenic Acid, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin A Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Kale

First 5 ingredients

Deboned Tuna – Tuna without bones is present in this cat food.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Potatoes - A grain-less carbohydrate. Often used in grain free formulas because they are easier to digest than grains. Also used as a bulking agent. An overall filler ingredient.

Calcium Carbonate – An acceptable form of calcium supplementation in the food.

Sodium Chloride – Another name for salt. Salt in cat food is not bad. The problem is there is no maximum allowed quantity.

Ingredients to Point Out

Fish/Seafood - Fish have elevated levels of mercury. Feeding a cat fish every now and then is okay. Long term exposure to fish will cause health problems. Also, the majority of the time fish used for pet food is rank and of poor quality. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption'. This applies to seafood as well.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Overall Score


First Mate
Turkey

 

Ingredients

Boneless Turkey, Water sufficient for processing, Potato, Chicken Liver, Calcium Carbonate, Sodium Chloride, Dicalcium Phosphate, Minerals (Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Iodine), Vitamins (Niacin, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine mononitrate, D-pantothenic Acid, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin A Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Kale

First 5 ingredients

Deboned Turkey - Meat, and skin without the bone of turkey. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the turkey loses most of its moisture as well as protein.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Potatoes - A grain-less carbohydrate. Often used in grain free formulas because they are easier to digest than grains. Also used as a bulking agent. An overall filler ingredient.

Chicken Liver – It is an organ meat that has many nutrients. Toxicity due to eating too much liver is a possibility, therefore intake has to be monitored. Present in cat food in safe amounts.

Calcium Carbonate – An acceptable form of calcium supplementation in the food.

Ingredients to Point Out

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Overall Score


First Mate
Turkey & Rice

 

Ingredients

Boneless/skinless Turkey, Water sufficient for processing, Rice, Calcium Carbonate, Sodium Chloride, Dicalcium Phosphate, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Kale, Minerals: (Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Iodine), Vitamins: (Niacin, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine mononitrate, D-pantothenic Acid, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin A Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Blueberries, Raspberries, Cranberries, Carrots.

First 5 ingredients

Deboned Turkey - Meat, and skin without the bone of turkey. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the turkey loses most of its moisture as well as protein.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Rice – A cereal grain that provides little to no nutrition in cat food, yet is very popular to add in cat food.

Chicken Liver – It is an organ meat that has many nutrients. Toxicity due to eating too much liver is a possibility, therefore intake has to be monitored. Present in cat food in safe amounts.

Calcium Carbonate – An acceptable form of calcium supplementation in the food.

Ingredients to Point Out

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Fruits - Fruits are added to make the food appear healthier. While ingredients such as blueberries, apples, bananas, etc. look good in cat food the truth is they are unnecessary. It is just as likely they won't provide any additonal benefits..

Carrots – A vegetable that is known for being rich in beta-carotene, a vitamin A source. Cats can absorb the beta-carotene but they cannot convert it to vitamin A. This defeats the purpose of this ingredient in cat food.

Overall Score


First Mate
Turkey & Wild Tuna

 

Ingredients

Boneless Turkey, Deboned Tuna, Water sufficient for processing, Potato, Calcium Carbonate, Sodium Chloride, Dicalcium Phosphate, Minerals (Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Iodine), Vitamins (Niacin, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine mononitrate, D-pantothenic Acid, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin A Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Kale

First 5 ingredients

Deboned Turkey - Meat, and skin without the bone of turkey. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the turkey loses most of its moisture as well as protein.

Deboned Tuna – Tuna without bones is present in this cat food.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Potatoes - A grain-less carbohydrate. Often used in grain free formulas because they are easier to digest than grains. Also used as a bulking agent. An overall filler ingredient.

Calcium Carbonate – An acceptable form of calcium supplementation in the food.

Ingredients to Point Out

Fish/Seafood - Fish have elevated levels of mercury. Feeding a cat fish every now and then is okay. Long term exposure to fish will cause health problems. Also, the majority of the time fish used for pet food is rank and of poor quality. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption'. This applies to seafood as well.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Overall Score


First Mate
Cat & Kitten Formula

 

Ingredients

Ocean Fish Meal, Chicken Meal, Oatmeal, Brown Rice, Chicken Fat (Mixed Tocopherols), Phosphoric acid, DL–Methionine, Dicalcium Phosphate, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Calcium Propionate, Blueberries, Raspberries, Cranberries, Minerals (Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Calcium Carbonate, Manganese Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin, Thiamine mononitrate, D-pantothenic Acid, Vitamin A Supplement, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid), Kale, Yeast Extract

First 5 ingredients

Fish Meal - The dried rendered ‘meat’ and bone of fish. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and ‘meat’ without the bone. If a fish is named, then the meal is made from the named fish. A more concentration source of protein, yet mercury levels are a concern.

Chicken Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of chicken. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Oatmeal - Grains that have no nutritional value for cats. Considered healthier than corn or wheat, yet still is a filler ingredient.

Brown Rice - Hulled, whole grain rice. It is considered healthier than white rice and corn. Brown rice is still hard for a cat digest. Still considered a filler ingredient.

Chicken Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols) - Used as an energy source as well as providing Omega-6 fatty acids, perhaps too much. Usually sprayed on and entices the cat to eat the food.

Ingredients to Point Out

Fish/Seafood - Fish have elevated levels of mercury. Feeding a cat fish every now and then is okay. Long term exposure to fish will cause health problems. Also, the majority of the time fish used for pet food is rank and of poor quality. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption'. This applies to seafood as well.

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Fruits - Fruits are added to make the food appear healthier. While ingredients such as blueberries, apples, bananas, etc. look good in cat food the truth is they are unnecessary. It is just as likely they won't provide any additonal benefits..

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


First Mate
Chicken Meal With Blueberries

 

Ingredients

Chicken Meal, Potato, Chicken Fat, Whole Blueberries, DL–Methionine, Minerals (Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Calcium Iodate, Cobalt Carbonate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Niacin, Thiamine mononitrate, D-calcium pantothenate, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement) Potassium Chloride, Calcium Propionate, Taurine, Yeast Extract, Kale, Glucosamine Hydrochloride

First 5 ingredients

Chicken Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of chicken. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Potatoes - A grain-less carbohydrate. Often used in grain free formulas because they are easier to digest than grains. Also used as a bulking agent. An overall filler ingredient.

Chicken Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols) - Used as an energy source as well as providing Omega-6 fatty acids, perhaps too much. Usually sprayed on and entices the cat to eat the food.

Whole Blueberries – A great fruit that is high in antioxidants.

DL-Methionine – A synthetic version of methionine. Methionine is an essential amino acid.

Ingredients to Point Out

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Blueberries – In cat food to make the food appear healthier. Cats don’t have a need for blueberries. It’s just as likely they won’t provide any benefits.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


First Mate
Classic Formula – Super Premium

 

Ingredients

Wild Pacific Ocean Fish Meal, Chicken Meal, Pearled Barley, Oatmeal, Chicken Fat, Fish Oil, Phosphoric acid, Dicalcium Phosphate, Choline Chloride, Methionine, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Propionate, Cranberries, Blueberries, Raspberries, Minerals (Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Iodine, Cobalt, Selenium) Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin C, Riboflavin, Niacin, D-pantothenic Acid, Thiamine mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Taurine

First 5 ingredients

Fish Meal - The dried rendered ‘meat’ and bone of fish. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and ‘meat’ without the bone. If a fish is named, then the meal is made from the named fish. A more concentration source of protein, yet mercury levels are a concern.

Chicken Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of chicken. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Pearled Barley – A cereal grain. Pearled means the barley has been dehulled. A healthier alternative to other grains but still unnecessary in cat food.

Oatmeal - Grains that have no nutritional value for cats. Considered healthier than corn or wheat, yet still is a filler ingredient.

Chicken Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols) - Used as an energy source as well as providing Omega-6 fatty acids, perhaps too much. Usually sprayed on and entices the cat to eat the food.

Ingredients to Point Out

Fish/Seafood - Fish have elevated levels of mercury. Feeding a cat fish every now and then is okay. Long term exposure to fish will cause health problems. Also, the majority of the time fish used for pet food is rank and of poor quality. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption'. This applies to seafood as well.

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Fruits - Fruits are added to make the food appear healthier. While ingredients such as blueberries, apples, bananas, etc. look good in cat food the truth is they are unnecessary. It is just as likely they won't provide any additonal benefits..

Selenium – We don’t know the exact source of the selenium. Sodium selenite, selenium yeast, or another source?.

Overall Score


First Mate
Indoor Cat Formula

 

Ingredients

Chicken Meal, Ocean Fish Meal, Oatmeal, Brown Rice, Chicken Fat (Mixed Tocopherols), Phosphoric acid, DL–Methionine, Choline Chloride, Dicalcium Phosphate, Taurine, Calcium Propionate, Blueberries, Raspberries, Cranberries, Minerals (Zinc Proteinate Iron Proteinate Calcium Carbonate Manganese Proteinate Copper Proteinate Sodium selenite Calcium Iodate), Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement Niacin Thiamine mononitrate D-pantothenic Acid Vitamin A Supplement Riboflavin Pyridoxine Hydrochloride Biotin Vitamin B12 Supplement Vitamin D3 Supplement Folic Acid), Kale, Yeast Extract

First 5 ingredients

Chicken Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of chicken. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Fish Meal - The dried rendered ‘meat’ and bone of fish. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and ‘meat’ without the bone. If a fish is named, then the meal is made from the named fish. A more concentration source of protein, yet mercury levels are a concern.

Oatmeal - Grains that have no nutritional value for cats. Considered healthier than corn or wheat, yet still is a filler ingredient.

Brown Rice - Hulled, whole grain rice. It is considered healthier than white rice and corn. Brown rice is still hard for a cat digest. Still considered a filler ingredient.

Chicken Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols) - Used as an energy source as well as providing Omega-6 fatty acids, perhaps too much. Usually sprayed on and entices the cat to eat the food.

Ingredients to Point Out

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Fish/Seafood - Fish have elevated levels of mercury. Feeding a cat fish every now and then is okay. Long term exposure to fish will cause health problems. Also, the majority of the time fish used for pet food is rank and of poor quality. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption'. This applies to seafood as well.

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Fruits - Fruits are added to make the food appear healthier. While ingredients such as blueberries, apples, bananas, etc. look good in cat food the truth is they are unnecessary. It is just as likely they won't provide any additonal benefits..

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


First Mate
Pacific Ocean Fish Meal With Blueberries

 

Ingredients

Pacific Ocean Fish Meal, Potato, Chicken Fat, Whole Blueberries, Minerals (Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Calcium Iodate, Cobalt Carbonate, Sodium Selenite), Vitamins (Niacin, Thiamine mononitrate, D-calcium pantothenate, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Choline Chloride, Calcium Propionate, DL–Methionine, Taurine, Yeast Extract, Kale, Glucosamine Hydrochloride

First 5 ingredients

Fish Meal - The dried rendered ‘meat’ and bone of fish. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and ‘meat’ without the bone. If a fish is named, then the meal is made from the named fish. A more concentration source of protein, yet mercury levels are a concern.

Potatoes - A grain-less carbohydrate. Often used in grain free formulas because they are easier to digest than grains. Also used as a bulking agent. An overall filler ingredient.

Chicken Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols) - Used as an energy source as well as providing Omega-6 fatty acids, perhaps too much. Usually sprayed on and entices the cat to eat the food.

Whole Blueberries – A great fruit that is high in antioxidants.

Zinc Proteinate – An acceptable form of zinc supplementation in cat food.

Ingredients to Point Out

Fish/Seafood - Fish have elevated levels of mercury. Feeding a cat fish every now and then is okay. Long term exposure to fish will cause health problems. Also, the majority of the time fish used for pet food is rank and of poor quality. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption'. This applies to seafood as well.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Blueberries – In cat food to make the food appear healthier. Cats don’t have a need for blueberries. It’s just as likely they won’t provide any benefits.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score



WET
Go to Chicken
Go to Chicken & Rice
Go to Chicken & Wild Tuna
Go to Salmon
Go to Salmon & Rice
Go to Salmon & Wild Tuna
Go to Tuna
Go to Turkey
Go to Turkey & Rice
Go to Turkey & Wild Tuna
DRY
Go to Cat & Kitten Formula
Go to Chicken Meal With Blueberries
Go to Classic Formula – Super Premium
Go to Indoor Cat Formula
Go to Pacific Ocean Fish Meal With Blueberries

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