Hills’ Science Diet Dry Cat Food Reviews


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Hill’s Science Diet
Adult Hairball Control

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Whole Grain Wheat, Corn Gluten Meal, Pork Fat, Powdered Cellulose, Chicken Meal, Dried Beet Pulp, Wheat Gluten, Chicken Liver Flavor, Soybean Oil, Lactic Acid, Fish Oil, Choline Chloride, Potassium Chloride, Calcium Sulfate, L-Lysine, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Taurine, Iodized Salt, L-Carnitine, minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Natural Flavors, Green Peas, Apples, Cranberries, Carrots, Broccoli, Beta-Carotene

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Whole Grain Wheat – The entire kernel of the grain is present. This is what makes it whole grain.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Pork Fat – This is pig fat. It is usually sprayed onto the food to make the food more appealing for cats.

Powdered Cellulose – Cellulose in powder form.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Cellulose – This ingredient is a fiber source, often used as a carbohydrate substitute. It also has thickening properties. It is a filler and lower quality ingredient. Cellulose can actually come from wood. This is just an example, it doesn't mean wood chips are actually in this food.

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Gluten – Gluten is the protein that is found in many different types of grains, including wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is a protein source. Cats simply cannot digest gluten and use it effectively in their bodies. They need protein from a meat source.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Apples – A fruit that looks healthy in a cat food formula, but like most fruits doesn’t provide any additional proven benefits.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Adult Hairball Control Light

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Brewers Rice, Corn Gluten Meal, Wheat Gluten, Powdered Cellulose, Whole Grain Wheat, Chicken Liver Flavor, Soybean Oil, Dried Beet Pulp, Calcium Sulfate, Lactic Acid, Potassium Chloride, Pork Fat, Fish Oil, Choline Chloride, Iodized Salt, Taurine, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), L-Carnitine, Green Peas, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Apples, Natural Flavors, Cranberries, Carrots, Broccoli, Beta-Carotene

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Brewers Rice – The small, milled fragments of processed rice. Contains less nutrients than whole white rice.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Wheat Gluten – Gluten that has been extracted from wheat. A plant based protein, so mostly nutritionally useless in cat food.

Powdered Cellulose – Cellulose in powder form.

Ingredients to Point Out

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Gluten – Gluten is the protein that is found in many different types of grains, including wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is a protein source. Cats simply cannot digest gluten and use it effectively in their bodies. They need protein from a meat source.

Cellulose – This ingredient is a fiber source, often used as a carbohydrate substitute. It also has thickening properties. It is a filler and lower quality ingredient. Cellulose can actually come from wood. This is just an example, it doesn't mean wood chips are actually in this food.

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Apples – A fruit that looks healthy in a cat food formula, but like most fruits doesn’t provide any additional proven benefits.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Adult Indoor

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Whole Grain Wheat, Corn Gluten Meal, Pork Fat, Powdered Cellulose, Chicken Meal, Wheat Gluten, Dried Beet Pulp, Chicken Liver Flavor, Soybean Oil, Lactic Acid, Fish Oil, Choline Chloride, Potassium Chloride, Calcium Sulfate, L-Lysine, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Taurine, Iodized Salt, L-Carnitine, minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Natural Flavors, Green Peas, Apples, Cranberries, Carrots, Broccoli, Beta-Carotene.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Whole Grain Wheat – The entire kernel of the grain is present. This is what makes it whole grain.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Pork Fat – This is pig fat. It is usually sprayed onto the food to make the food more appealing for cats.

Powdered Cellulose – Cellulose in powder form.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Cellulose – This ingredient is a fiber source, often used as a carbohydrate substitute. It also has thickening properties. It is a filler and lower quality ingredient. Cellulose can actually come from wood. This is just an example, it doesn't mean wood chips are actually in this food.

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Gluten – Gluten is the protein that is found in many different types of grains, including wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is a protein source. Cats simply cannot digest gluten and use it effectively in their bodies. They need protein from a meat source.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Apples – A fruit that looks healthy in a cat food formula, but like most fruits doesn’t provide any additional proven benefits.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Adult Light

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Whole Grain Wheat, Corn Gluten Meal, Brewers Rice, Powdered Cellulose, Pork Fat, Wheat Gluten, Dried Beet Pulp, Chicken Liver Flavor, Calcium Sulfate, Lactic Acid, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Biotin, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid), Taurine, Calcium Carbonate, minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), L-Carnitine, Oat Fiber, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Natural Flavors, Beta-Carotene, Apples, Broccoli, Carrots, Cranberries, Green Peas.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Whole Grain Wheat – The entire kernel of the grain is present. This is what makes it whole grain.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Brewers Rice – The small, milled fragments of processed rice. Contains less nutrients than whole white rice.

Powdered Cellulose – Cellulose in powder form.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Cellulose – This ingredient is a fiber source, often used as a carbohydrate substitute. It also has thickening properties. It is a filler and lower quality ingredient. Cellulose can actually come from wood. This is just an example, it doesn't mean wood chips are actually in this food.

Gluten – Gluten is the protein that is found in many different types of grains, including wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is a protein source. Cats simply cannot digest gluten and use it effectively in their bodies. They need protein from a meat source.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Apples – A fruit that looks healthy in a cat food formula, but like most fruits doesn’t provide any additional proven benefits.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Adult Multiple Benefit

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Brewers Rice, Corn Gluten Meal, Powdered Cellulose, Wheat Gluten, Whole Grain Wheat, Chicken Liver Flavor, Soybean Oil, Dried Beet Pulp, Calcium Sulfate, Lactic Acid, Potassium Chloride, Pork Fat, Fish Oil, Choline Chloride, Iodized Salt, Taurine, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), L-Carnitine, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Natural Flavors, Beta-Carotene.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Brewers Rice – The small, milled fragments of processed rice. Contains less nutrients than whole white rice.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Powdered Cellulose – Cellulose in powder form.

Wheat Gluten – Gluten that has been extracted from wheat. A plant based protein, so mostly nutritionally useless in cat food.

Ingredients to Point Out

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Cellulose – This ingredient is a fiber source, often used as a carbohydrate substitute. It also has thickening properties. It is a filler and lower quality ingredient. Cellulose can actually come from wood. This is just an example, it doesn't mean wood chips are actually in this food.

Gluten – Gluten is the protein that is found in many different types of grains, including wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is a protein source. Cats simply cannot digest gluten and use it effectively in their bodies. They need protein from a meat source.

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Adult Optimal Care Original

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Whole Grain Wheat, Corn Gluten Meal, Pork Fat, Chicken Meal, Dried Beet Pulp, Brown Rice, Chicken Liver Flavor, Calcium Sulfate, Lactic Acid, Potassium Chloride, Fish Oil, Soybean Oil, Iodized Salt, Choline Chloride, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Taurine, minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Oat Fiber, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Natural Flavors, Beta-Carotene, Apples, Broccoli, Carrots, Cranberries, Green Peas.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Whole Grain Wheat – The entire kernel of the grain is present. This is what makes it whole grain.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Pork Fat – This is pig fat. It is usually sprayed onto the food to make the food more appealing for cats.

Chicken Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of chicken. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Apples – A fruit that looks healthy in a cat food formula, but like most fruits doesn’t provide any additional proven benefits.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Adult Oral Care

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Brown Rice, Corn Gluten Meal, Chicken Fat, Powdered Cellulose, Wheat Gluten, Chicken Meal, Flaxseed, Chicken Liver Flavor, Lactic Acid, Potassium Chloride, Calcium Sulfate, Choline Chloride, L-Lysine, Iodized Salt, Taurine, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), DL-Methionine, Oat Fiber, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Natural Flavors, Beta-Carotene, Apples, Broccoli, Carrots, Cranberries, Green Peas.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Brown Rice - Hulled, whole grain rice. It is considered healthier than white rice and corn. Brown rice is still hard for a cat digest. Still considered a filler ingredient.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Chicken Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols) - Used as an energy source as well as providing Omega-6 fatty acids, perhaps too much. Usually sprayed on and entices the cat to eat the food.

Powdered Cellulose – Cellulose in powder form.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Cellulose – This ingredient is a fiber source, often used as a carbohydrate substitute. It also has thickening properties. It is a filler and lower quality ingredient. Cellulose can actually come from wood. This is just an example, it doesn't mean wood chips are actually in this food.

Gluten – Gluten is the protein that is found in many different types of grains, including wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is a protein source. Cats simply cannot digest gluten and use it effectively in their bodies. They need protein from a meat source.

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Apples – A fruit that looks healthy in a cat food formula, but like most fruits doesn’t provide any additional proven benefits.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Adult Perfect Weight

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Brewers Rice, Corn Gluten Meal, Wheat Gluten, Powdered Cellulose, Chicken Meal, Tomato Pomace, Dried Beet Pulp, Flaxseed, Chicken Fat, Chicken Liver Flavor, Coconut Oil, Lactic Acid, Calcium Sulfate, L-Lysine, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Carrots, DL-Methionine, Taurine, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Iodized Salt, Dicalcium Phosphate, minerals (Manganese Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), L-Carnitine, Oat Fiber, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Natural Flavors, Beta-Carotene, Apples, Broccoli, Cranberries, Green Peas.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Brewers Rice – The small, milled fragments of processed rice. Contains less nutrients than whole white rice.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Wheat Gluten – Gluten that has been extracted from wheat. A plant based protein, so mostly nutritionally useless in cat food.

Powdered Cellulose – Cellulose in powder form.

Ingredients to Point Out

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Cellulose – This ingredient is a fiber source, often used as a carbohydrate substitute. It also has thickening properties. It is a filler and lower quality ingredient. Cellulose can actually come from wood. This is just an example, it doesn't mean wood chips are actually in this food.

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Pomace – Pomace is the remains (skin, seeds, pulp) of whatever ingredient indicated after being pressed for juice/oil. It is a byproduct of the cider industry and inexpensive compared to fresh fruits/vegetables. Capable of providing added benefits however unnecessary.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Apples – A fruit that looks healthy in a cat food formula, but like most fruits doesn’t provide any additional proven benefits.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Adult Sensitive Stomach & Skin

 

Ingredients

Brewers Rice, Corn Gluten Meal, Pork Fat, Pork Meal, Egg Product, Whole Grain Corn, Chicken Liver Flavor, Lactic Acid, Oat Fiber, Potassium Chloride, L-Lysine, Choline Chloride, DL-Methionine, Calcium Carbonate, Taurine, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Iodized Salt, minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), L-Tryptophan, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Natural Flavors, Beta-Carotene.

First 5 ingredients

Brewers Rice – The small, milled fragments of processed rice. Contains less nutrients than whole white rice.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Pork Fat – This is pig fat. It is usually sprayed onto the food to make the food more appealing for cats.

Pork Meal -The dried, rendered skin, meat and bone of pigs. It is a more concentrated source of protein compared to just pork.

Dried Egg – Egg or egg product that has had the moisture removed.

Ingredients to Point Out

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Egg/Egg product – The biggest concern regarding egg ingredients is the quality of eggs used in pet food formulas. Usually it is egg waste. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption.'

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Adult Urinary Hairball Control

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Whole Grain Wheat, Corn Gluten Meal, Pork Fat, Powdered Cellulose, Wheat Gluten, Chicken Liver Flavor, Dried Beet Pulp, Soybean Oil, Lactic Acid, Calcium Sulfate, Fish Oil, Choline Chloride, Potassium Chloride, L-Lysine, Iodized Salt, Dicalcium Phosphate, Taurine, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Potassium Citrate, minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), L-Carnitine, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Natural Flavors, Green Peas, Apples, Cranberries, Carrots, Broccoli, Beta-Carotene

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Whole Grain Wheat – The entire kernel of the grain is present. This is what makes it whole grain.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Pork Fat – This is pig fat. It is usually sprayed onto the food to make the food more appealing for cats.

Powdered Cellulose – Cellulose in powder form.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Cellulose – This ingredient is a fiber source, often used as a carbohydrate substitute. It also has thickening properties. It is a filler and lower quality ingredient. Cellulose can actually come from wood. This is just an example, it doesn't mean wood chips are actually in this food.

Gluten – Gluten is the protein that is found in many different types of grains, including wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is a protein source. Cats simply cannot digest gluten and use it effectively in their bodies. They need protein from a meat source.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Apples – A fruit that looks healthy in a cat food formula, but like most fruits doesn’t provide any additional proven benefits.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Adult 7+ Active Longevity

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Whole Grain Wheat, Corn Gluten Meal, Pork Fat, Brewers Rice, Dried Beet Pulp, Chicken Liver Flavor, Calcium Sulfate, Lactic Acid, Fish Oil, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Dicalcium Phosphate, Taurine, minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), DL-Methionine, L-Carnitine, L-Lysine, Oat Fiber, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Natural Flavors, Beta-Carotene, Apples, Broccoli, Carrots, Cranberries, Green Peas.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Whole Grain Wheat – The entire kernel of the grain is present. This is what makes it whole grain.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Pork Fat – This is pig fat. It is usually sprayed onto the food to make the food more appealing for cats.

Brewers Rice – The small, milled fragments of processed rice. Contains less nutrients than whole white rice.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Apples – A fruit that looks healthy in a cat food formula, but like most fruits doesn’t provide any additional proven benefits.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Adult 7+ Chicken & Rice Recipe

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Brown Rice, Corn Gluten Meal, Whole Grain Oats, Pea Protein, Chicken Fat, Chicken Liver Flavor, Lactic Acid, Soybean Oil, Dried Tomato Pomace, Calcium Sulfate, Fish Oil, Choline Chloride, DL-Methionine, Iodized Salt, Taurine, Broccoli, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Potassium Chloride, minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), L-Carnitine, Calcium Carbonate, Natural Flavors, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Beta-Carotene.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Brown Rice - Hulled, whole grain rice. It is considered healthier than white rice and corn. Brown rice is still hard for a cat digest. Still considered a filler ingredient.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Whole Grain Oats – A cereal grain. The grain is still whole, containing the endosperm, bran and germ.

Pea Protein – Protein extracted from the yellow pea. It is protein from a non-animal source, providing little to no nutrition.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Non-Meat Protein – This refers to protein extracted particularly from non-meat sources, this includes pea and potato protein amongst others. These ingredients have a low biological value. The protein from these sources simply cannot be used effectively by cats, as this protein lacks essential amino acids the cat needs.

Pomace – Pomace is the remains (skin, seeds, pulp) of whatever ingredient indicated after being pressed for juice/oil. It is a byproduct of the cider industry and inexpensive compared to fresh fruits/vegetables. Capable of providing added benefits however unnecessary.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Adult 7+ Hairball Control

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Whole Grain Wheat, Corn Gluten Meal, Pork Fat, Powdered Cellulose, Wheat Gluten, Brewers Rice, Dried Beet Pulp, Chicken Liver Flavor, Lactic Acid, Calcium Sulfate, Potassium Chloride, Fish Oil, Choline Chloride, Calcium Carbonate, Taurine, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Iodized Salt, L-Lysine, minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), L-Carnitine, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Green Peas, Natural Flavors, Apples, Cranberries, Carrots, Broccoli, Beta-Carotene

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Whole Grain Wheat – The entire kernel of the grain is present. This is what makes it whole grain.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Pork Fat – This is pig fat. It is usually sprayed onto the food to make the food more appealing for cats.

Powdered Cellulose – Cellulose in powder form.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Cellulose – This ingredient is a fiber source, often used as a carbohydrate substitute. It also has thickening properties. It is a filler and lower quality ingredient. Cellulose can actually come from wood. This is just an example, it doesn't mean wood chips are actually in this food.

Gluten – Gluten is the protein that is found in many different types of grains, including wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is a protein source. Cats simply cannot digest gluten and use it effectively in their bodies. They need protein from a meat source.

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Apples – A fruit that looks healthy in a cat food formula, but like most fruits doesn’t provide any additional proven benefits.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Adult 7+ Indoor

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Whole Grain Wheat, Corn Gluten Meal, Pork Fat, Powdered Cellulose, Wheat Gluten, Brewers Rice, Chicken Liver Flavor, Dried Beet Pulp, Lactic Acid, Calcium Sulfate, Potassium Chloride, Fish Oil, Choline Chloride, Calcium Carbonate, Taurine, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Iodized Salt, L-Lysine, minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), L-Carnitine, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Green Peas, Natural Flavors, Apples, Cranberries, Carrots, Broccoli, Beta-Carotene.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Whole Grain Wheat – The entire kernel of the grain is present. This is what makes it whole grain.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Pork Fat – This is pig fat. It is usually sprayed onto the food to make the food more appealing for cats.

Powdered Cellulose – Cellulose in powder form.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Cellulose – This ingredient is a fiber source, often used as a carbohydrate substitute. It also has thickening properties. It is a filler and lower quality ingredient. Cellulose can actually come from wood. This is just an example, it doesn't mean wood chips are actually in this food.

Gluten – Gluten is the protein that is found in many different types of grains, including wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is a protein source. Cats simply cannot digest gluten and use it effectively in their bodies. They need protein from a meat source.

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Apples – A fruit that looks healthy in a cat food formula, but like most fruits doesn’t provide any additional proven benefits.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Adult 11+ Age Defying

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Whole Grain Wheat, Corn Gluten Meal, Brewers Rice, Pork Fat, Egg Product, Dried Beet Pulp, Chicken Liver Flavor, Flaxseed, Wheat Gluten, Lactic Acid, Fish Oil, Calcium Sulfate, Potassium Chloride, Soybean Oil, Choline Chloride, Calcium Carbonate, Taurine, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), L-Carnitine, Iodized Salt, Oat Fiber, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Natural Flavors, Beta-Carotene, Apples, Broccoli, Carrots, Cranberries, Green Peas

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Whole Grain Wheat – The entire kernel of the grain is present. This is what makes it whole grain.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Brewers Rice – The small, milled fragments of processed rice. Contains less nutrients than whole white rice.

Pork Fat – This is pig fat. It is usually sprayed onto the food to make the food more appealing for cats.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Egg/Egg product – The biggest concern regarding egg ingredients is the quality of eggs used in pet food formulas. Usually it is egg waste. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption.'

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Gluten – Gluten is the protein that is found in many different types of grains, including wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is a protein source. Cats simply cannot digest gluten and use it effectively in their bodies. They need protein from a meat source.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Apples – A fruit that looks healthy in a cat food formula, but like most fruits doesn’t provide any additional proven benefits.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Adult 11+ Indoor Age Defying

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Whole Grain Wheat, Corn Gluten Meal, Pork Fat, Wheat Gluten, Powdered Cellulose, Dried Beet Pulp, Chicken Liver Flavor, Brewers Rice, Lactic Acid, Fish Oil, Calcium Sulfate, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Calcium Carbonate, Taurine, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), L-Carnitine, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Green Peas, Natural Flavors, Apples, Cranberries, Carrots, Broccoli, Beta-Carotene

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Whole Grain Wheat – The entire kernel of the grain is present. This is what makes it whole grain.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Pork Fat – This is pig fat. It is usually sprayed onto the food to make the food more appealing for cats.

Wheat Gluten – Gluten that has been extracted from wheat. A plant based protein, so mostly nutritionally useless in cat food.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Gluten – Gluten is the protein that is found in many different types of grains, including wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is a protein source. Cats simply cannot digest gluten and use it effectively in their bodies. They need protein from a meat source.

Cellulose – This ingredient is a fiber source, often used as a carbohydrate substitute. It also has thickening properties. It is a filler and lower quality ingredient. Cellulose can actually come from wood. This is just an example, it doesn't mean wood chips are actually in this food.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Grains – Grains are of poor nutritonal value for cats. Cats cannot digest grains easily. They are in cat foods as a filler ingredient and filler only. Wheat, corn, corn flour, flour, white rice, ground rice, barley, brewer's rice, etc. fall into this category. Ingredients such as wheat gluten and corn gluten also fall into this category as these ingredients originate from grains.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Apples – A fruit that looks healthy in a cat food formula, but like most fruits doesn’t provide any additional proven benefits.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Kitten Healthy Development

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Whole Grain Wheat, Corn Gluten Meal, Chicken Fat, Whole Grain Corn, Chicken Liver Flavor, Dried Beet Pulp, Soybean Oil, Dicalcium Phosphate, Fish Oil, Calcium Sulfate, Lactic Acid, Egg Product, Flaxseed, Choline Chloride, Powdered Cellulose, L-Lysine, Potassium Chloride, Taurine, Iodized Salt, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Biotin, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), DL-Methionine, Calcium Carbonate, Oat Fiber, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Natural Flavors, Beta-Carotene, Apples, Broccoli, Carrots, Cranberries, Green Peas.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Whole Grain Wheat – The entire kernel of the grain is present. This is what makes it whole grain.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Chicken Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols) - Used as an energy source as well as providing Omega-6 fatty acids, perhaps too much. Usually sprayed on and entices the cat to eat the food.

Whole Grain Corn – Whole grain corn is corn that hasn’t had the germ in the kernel removed.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Egg/Egg product – The biggest concern regarding egg ingredients is the quality of eggs used in pet food formulas. Usually it is egg waste. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption.'

Cellulose – This ingredient is a fiber source, often used as a carbohydrate substitute. It also has thickening properties. It is a filler and lower quality ingredient. Cellulose can actually come from wood. This is just an example, it doesn't mean wood chips are actually in this food.

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Apples – A fruit that looks healthy in a cat food formula, but like most fruits doesn’t provide any additional proven benefits.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Overall Score


Hill’s Science Diet
Kitten Indoor

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Whole Grain Wheat, Corn Gluten Meal, Chicken Fat, Chicken Liver Flavor, Whole Grain Corn, Dried Beet Pulp, Soybean Oil, Dicalcium Phosphate, Fish Oil, Lactic Acid, Calcium Sulfate, Flaxseed, L-Lysine, Powdered Cellulose, Potassium Chloride, Egg Product, Choline Chloride, Iodized Salt, Taurine, DL-Methionine, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of Vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Biotin, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Calcium Carbonate, Oat Fiber, Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Natural Flavors, Beta-Carotene, Apples, Broccoli, Carrots, Cranberries, Green Peas.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Whole Grain Wheat – The entire kernel of the grain is present. This is what makes it whole grain.

Corn Gluten Meal– A by-product of processing corn. There is actually no gluten, but corn protein.

Chicken Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols) - Used as an energy source as well as providing Omega-6 fatty acids, perhaps too much. Usually sprayed on and entices the cat to eat the food.

Chicken Liver Flavor – Added flavoring to entice the cat to eat the food.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Calcium Sulfate – A common industrial chemical. It is a cheaper form of calcium.

Cellulose – This ingredient is a fiber source, often used as a carbohydrate substitute. It also has thickening properties. It is a filler and lower quality ingredient. Cellulose can actually come from wood. This is just an example, it doesn't mean wood chips are actually in this food.

Egg/Egg product – The biggest concern regarding egg ingredients is the quality of eggs used in pet food formulas. Usually it is egg waste. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption.'

Zinc Oxide – Artificially produced source of zinc more often seen in non-food materials. This includes rubber, paints, creams, and batteries. Poisoning due to ingesting too much zinc oxide will occur; present in cat food in safe amounts. Many people don't like to see this ingredient in cat food.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Apples – A fruit that looks healthy in a cat food formula, but like most fruits doesn’t provide any additional proven benefits.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Overall Score



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