Wysong Cat Food Reviews and Ratings


WET
Go to Epigen Canned Beef
Go to Epigen Canned Chicken
Go to Epigen Canned Duck
Go to Epigen Canned Rabbit
Go to Epigen Canned Salmon
Go to Epigen Canned Turkey
Go to Uretic with Organic Chicken
DRY
Go to Anergen
Go to Epigen
Go to Epigen 90
Go to Fundamentals
Go to Geriatrx
Go to Nurture
Go to Nurture with Quail
Go to Optimal Vitality
Go to Uretic
Go to Vegan
Go to Vitality


Wysong
Epigen Canned Beef

 

Ingredients

Beef, Water Sufficient for Processing, Natural Flavor, Organic Guar Gum, Mixed Tocopherols.

First 5 ingredients

Beef – Meat, skin, and bone of cattle. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, it loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Natural Flavor - Added flavor to the food to make it more palatable. This natural flavor can be obtained from anything that is not man made to give the food the flavor. This means obtaining the flavor from less than desirable ingredients, such as by-products.

Guar Gum - A less harmful thickening agent used in cat food. Still, interferes with protein absorption and is known to cause GI upset.

Mixed Tocopherols -This is a natural source of Vitamin E that is used mainly as a preservative in cat food. It is considered a better alternative to artificial preservatives.

Ingredients to Point Out

Guar Gum - A less harmful thickening agent used in cat food. Still, interferes with protein absorption and is known to cause GI upset.

Overall Score


Wysong
Epigen Canned Chicken

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Water Sufficient for Processing, Natural Flavor, Organic Guar Gum, Mixed Tocopherols.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Natural Flavor - Added flavor to the food to make it more palatable. This natural flavor can be obtained from anything that is not man made to give the food the flavor. This means obtaining the flavor from less than desirable ingredients, such as by-products.

Guar Gum - A less harmful thickening agent used in cat food. Still, interferes with protein absorption and is known to cause GI upset.

Mixed Tocopherols -This is a natural source of Vitamin E that is used mainly as a preservative in cat food. It is considered a better alternative to artificial preservatives.

Ingredients to Point Out

Guar Gum - A less harmful thickening agent used in cat food. Still, interferes with protein absorption and is known to cause GI upset.

Overall Score


Wysong
Epigen Canned Duck

 

Ingredients

Duck, Water Sufficient for Processing, Natural Flavor, Organic Guar Gum, Mixed Tocopherols.

First 5 ingredients

Duck – Meat, skin, and bone of duck. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the duck loses most of its moisture as well as protein. Despite this, a good quality protein source.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Natural Flavor - Added flavor to the food to make it more palatable. This natural flavor can be obtained from anything that is not man made to give the food the flavor. This means obtaining the flavor from less than desirable ingredients, such as by-products.

Guar Gum - A less harmful thickening agent used in cat food. Still, interferes with protein absorption and is known to cause GI upset.

Mixed Tocopherols -This is a natural source of Vitamin E that is used mainly as a preservative in cat food. It is considered a better alternative to artificial preservatives.

Ingredients to Point Out

Guar Gum - A less harmful thickening agent used in cat food. Still, interferes with protein absorption and is known to cause GI upset.

Overall Score


Wysong
Epigen Canned Rabbit

 

Ingredients

Rabbit, Water Sufficient for Processing, Natural Flavor, Organic Guar Gum, Mixed Tocopherols.

First 5 ingredients

Rabbit - Meat, skin, and bone of a rabbit. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, rabbit loses most of its moisture as well as protein. Despite not being popular in cat food formulas, rabbit is safe and nutritious.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Natural Flavor - Added flavor to the food to make it more palatable. This natural flavor can be obtained from anything that is not man made to give the food the flavor. This means obtaining the flavor from less than desirable ingredients, such as by-products.

Guar Gum - A less harmful thickening agent used in cat food. Still, interferes with protein absorption and is known to cause GI upset.

Mixed Tocopherols -This is a natural source of Vitamin E that is used mainly as a preservative in cat food. It is considered a better alternative to artificial preservatives.

Ingredients to Point Out

Guar Gum - A less harmful thickening agent used in cat food. Still, interferes with protein absorption and is known to cause GI upset.

Overall Score


Wysong
Epigen Canned Salmon

 

Ingredients

Salmon, Water Sufficient for Processing, Natural Flavor, Organic Guar Gum, Mixed Tocopherols.

First 5 ingredients

Salmon – A species of fish. Salmon is very popular in the fishing industry. It provides protein and may have elevated levels of mercury. Concerns about the quality of fish used in pet foods.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Natural Flavor - Added flavor to the food to make it more palatable. This natural flavor can be obtained from anything that is not man made to give the food the flavor. This means obtaining the flavor from less than desirable ingredients, such as by-products.

Guar Gum - A less harmful thickening agent used in cat food. Still, interferes with protein absorption and is known to cause GI upset.

Mixed Tocopherols -This is a natural source of Vitamin E that is used mainly as a preservative in cat food. It is considered a better alternative to artificial preservatives.

Ingredients to Point Out

Guar Gum - A less harmful thickening agent used in cat food. Still, interferes with protein absorption and is known to cause GI upset.

Overall Score


Wysong
Epigen Canned Turkey

 

Ingredients

Turkey, Water Sufficient for Processing, Natural Flavor, Organic Guar Gum, Mixed Tocopherols.

First 5 ingredients

Turkey – Meat, skin, and bone of turkey. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the turkey. loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Water - Used to add moisture to the formula. In canned foods, moisture percentage can be up to 80%.

Natural Flavor - Added flavor to the food to make it more palatable. This natural flavor can be obtained from anything that is not man made to give the food the flavor. This means obtaining the flavor from less than desirable ingredients, such as by-products.

Guar Gum - A less harmful thickening agent used in cat food. Still, interferes with protein absorption and is known to cause GI upset.

Mixed Tocopherols -This is a natural source of Vitamin E that is used mainly as a preservative in cat food. It is considered a better alternative to artificial preservatives.

Ingredients to Point Out

Guar Gum - A less harmful thickening agent used in cat food. Still, interferes with protein absorption and is known to cause GI upset.

Overall Score


Wysong
Uretic with Organic Chicken

 

Ingredients

Organic Chicken, Brown Rice, Blueberry, DL-Methionine, Cranberry Extract, Taurine, Organic Barley Grass Powder, Dried Kelp, Yeast Extract, Mixed Tocopherols, Rosemary Extract, Chicory Root, Hemicellulose Extract, Natural Flavor, Minerals (Potassium Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Copper Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate), Calcium Carbonate, Vitamins (Ascorbic Acid [source of Vitamin C], Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid), Pepper.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Brown Rice - Hulled, whole grain rice. It is considered healthier than white rice and corn. Brown rice is still hard for a cat digest. Still considered a filler ingredient.

Blueberry – A fruit added to a cat food formula to make the food appear healthier. Cats have no real need for fruits.

DL-Methionine -A synthetic version of methionine. Methionine is an essential amino acid.

Cranberry Extract – Used for added benefits of maintaining a healthy urinary tract system.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Blueberries – A great fruit that is high in antioxidants. In cat food to make the food appear healthier. Cats don’t have a need for blueberries. It’s just as likely they won’t provide any benefits.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


Wysong
Anergen

 

Ingredients

Lamb Meal, Brown Rice, Sweet Potatoes, Flaxseeds, Soybean Oil, Dried Plain Beet Pulp, Montmorillonite Clay, Crab Meal, Coconut Oil, Salt, Rice Bran Oil, Calcium Carbonate, Tomato Pomace, Calcium Propionate, Taurine, Choline Chloride, Organic Barley Grass, Blueberry, Dried Kelp, Yogurt, Citric Acid, Apple Pectin, Fish Oil, Yeast Extract, Mixed Tocopherols, Rosemary Extract, Chicory Root, Hemicellulose Extract, Yeast Culture, Carrots, Celery, Parsley, Lettuce, Watercress, Spinach, Minerals (Potassium Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Copper Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate), Vitamins (Ascorbic Acid [source of Vitamin C], Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid), Dried Bacillus licheniformis Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Pepper.

First 5 ingredients

Lamb Meal -The dried, rendered skin, meat and bone of lambs. It is a more concentrated source of protein compared to just lamb.

Brown Rice - Hulled, whole grain rice. It is considered healthier than white rice and corn. Brown rice is still hard for a cat digest. Still considered a filler ingredient.

Sweet Potatoes - Usually in cat foods as a carbohydrate substitute as well as a bulking agent. A better alternative to potatoes yet still considered a filler ingredient.

Flaxseed – Flaxseed is a source of fiber but overall not a very useful ingredient. Cats cannot use flaxseed as an Omega-3 source. Usually used to make the food appear healthier.

Soybean Oil – Depending on what type of soybean oil it is, this ingredient can be unhealthy or healthy. Soybean oil is a good source of Omega-3 fatty acids (good kind). However, hydrogenated soybean oil is unhealthy.

Ingredients to Point Out

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Montmorillonite Clay -There is not enough research and facts about this ingredient in cat food. Certain types of this clay may not be pure, or free from dioxins. Dioxins are harmful. The FDA recommends that this clay be tested before being used in cat foods. It is a recommendation however, not a requirement.

Fish/Seafood - Fish have elevated levels of mercury. Feeding a cat fish every now and then is okay. Long term exposure to fish will cause health problems. Also, the majority of the time fish used for pet food is rank and of poor quality. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption'. This applies to seafood as well.

Pomace – Pomace is the remains (skin, seeds, pulp) of whatever ingredient indicated after being pressed for juice/oil. It is a byproduct of the cider industry and inexpensive compared to fresh fruits/vegetables. Capable of providing added benefits however unnecessary.

Blueberries – A great fruit that is high in antioxidants. In cat food to make the food appear healthier. Cats don’t have a need for blueberries. It’s just as likely they won’t provide any benefits.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


Wysong
Epigen

 

Ingredients

Organic Chicken, Chicken Meal, Turkey Meal, Potato Protein, Meat Protein Isolate, Chicken Fat, Gelatin, Dried Plain Beet Pulp, Natural Flavor, Coconut Oil, Chia Seeds, Salt, Calcium Carbonate, Tomato Pomace, Calcium Propionate, Taurine, Choline Chloride, Organic Barley Grass Powder, Blueberry, Dried Kelp, Yogurt (Whey, Milk Solids, Yogurt Cultures), Apple Pectin, Fish Oil, Yeast Extract, Citric Acid, Chicory Root, Hemicellulose Extract, Mixed Tocopherols, Rosemary Extract, Yeast Culture, Carrots, Celery, Parsley, Lettuce, Watercress, Spinach, Minerals (Potassium Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Copper Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate), Vitamins (Ascorbic Acid [source of Vitamin C], Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid), Dried Bacillus licheniformis Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Pepper.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Chicken Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of chicken. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Turkey Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of turkey. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Potato Protein – The protein from potatoes. This is protein from a vegetable source.

Meat Protein Isolate -The protein extracted from meat. Isolate is more pure than concentrate as isolate has both carbohydrates and fiber removed.

Ingredients to Point Out

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Non-Meat Protein – This refers to protein extracted particularly from non-meat sources, this includes pea and potato protein amongst others. These ingredients have a low biological value. The protein from these sources simply cannot be used effectively by cats, as this protein lacks essential amino acids the cat needs.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Pomace – Pomace is the remains (skin, seeds, pulp) of whatever ingredient indicated after being pressed for juice/oil. It is a byproduct of the cider industry and inexpensive compared to fresh fruits/vegetables. Capable of providing added benefits however unnecessary.

Blueberries – A great fruit that is high in antioxidants. In cat food to make the food appear healthier. Cats don’t have a need for blueberries. It’s just as likely they won’t provide any benefits.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


Wysong
Epigen 90

 

Ingredients

Chicken Meal, Organic Chicken, Meat Protein Isolate, Chicken Fat, Gelatin, Natural Flavor, Coconut Oil, Chia Seeds, Taurine, Calcium Propionate, Choline Chloride, Apple Pectin, Fish Oil, Yeast Extract, Citric Acid, Chicory Root, Hemicellulose Extract, Mixed Tocopherols, Rosemary Extract, Yeast Culture, Minerals (Potassium Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Copper Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate), Calcium Carbonate, Vitamins (Ascorbic Acid [source of Vitamin C], Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid), Dried Bacillus licheniformis Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of chicken. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Meat Protein Isolate – The protein extracted from meat. Isolate is more pure than concentrate as isolate has both carbohydrates and fiber removed.

Chicken Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols) - Used as an energy source as well as providing Omega-6 fatty acids, perhaps too much. Usually sprayed on and entices the cat to eat the food.

Gelatin – Obtained from the collagen of various animal by-products. It is a protein source and helps bind the food together.

Ingredients to Point Out

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


Wysong
Fundamentals

 

Ingredients

Chicken Meal, Brown Rice, Organic Chicken, Chicken Fat, Natural Chicken Flavor, Taurine, Calcium Propionate, Choline Chloride, Citric Acid, Yeast Extract, Mixed Tocopherols, Rosemary Extract, Chicory Root, Yeast Culture, Minerals (Potassium Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Copper Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate), Calcium Carbonate, Vitamins (Ascorbic Acid [source of Vitamin C], Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid), Dried Bacillus licheniformis Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of chicken. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Brown Rice - Hulled, whole grain rice. It is considered healthier than white rice and corn. Brown rice is still hard for a cat digest. Still considered a filler ingredient.

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Chicken Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols) - Used as an energy source as well as providing Omega-6 fatty acids, perhaps too much. Usually sprayed on and entices the cat to eat the food.

Natural Flavor - Added flavor to the food to make it more palatable. This natural flavor can be obtained from anything that is not man made to give the food the flavor. This means obtaining the flavor from less than desirable ingredients, such as by-products.

Ingredients to Point Out

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


Wysong
Geriatrx

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Chicken Meal, Fish Meal, Turkey Meal, Brown Rice, Peas, Oat Groats, Pea Protein, Chicken Fat, Flaxseeds, Dried Plain Beet Pulp, Eggs, Montmorillonite Clay, Crab Meal, Sesame Seeds, Natural Chicken and Fish Flavor, Whey, Salt, Calcium Carbonate, Colostrum, Tomato Pomace, Calcium Propionate, Taurine, Chicken Cartilage, Choline Chloride, Organic Barley Grass, Blueberry, Dried Kelp, Yogurt, Citric Acid, Apple Pectin, Fish Oil, Yeast Extract, Yeast Culture, Mixed Tocopherols, Rosemary Extract, Chicory Root, Hemicellulose Extract, Carrots, Celery, Beets, Parsley, Lettuce, Watercress, Spinach, Minerals (Potassium Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Copper Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate), Vitamins (Ascorbic Acid [source of Vitamin C], Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid), Dried Bacillus licheniformis Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Pepper.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Chicken Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of chicken. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Fish Meal - The dried rendered ‘meat’ and bone of fish. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and ‘meat’ without the bone. If a fish is named, then the meal is made from the named fish. A more concentration source of protein, yet mercury levels are a concern.

Turkey Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of turkey. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Brown Rice - Hulled, whole grain rice. It is considered healthier than white rice and corn. Brown rice is still hard for a cat digest. Still considered a filler ingredient.

Ingredients to Point Out

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Fish/Seafood - Fish have elevated levels of mercury. Feeding a cat fish every now and then is okay. Long term exposure to fish will cause health problems. Also, the majority of the time fish used for pet food is rank and of poor quality. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption'. This applies to seafood as well.

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Non-Meat Protein – This refers to protein extracted particularly from non-meat sources, this includes pea and potato protein amongst others. These ingredients have a low biological value. The protein from these sources simply cannot be used effectively by cats, as this protein lacks essential amino acids the cat needs.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Egg/Egg product – The biggest concern regarding egg ingredients is the quality of eggs used in pet food formulas. Usually it is egg waste. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption.'

Montmorillonite Clay -There is not enough research and facts about this ingredient in cat food. Certain types of this clay may not be pure, or free from dioxins. Dioxins are harmful. The FDA recommends that this clay be tested before being used in cat foods. It is a recommendation however, not a requirement.

Pomace – Pomace is the remains (skin, seeds, pulp) of whatever ingredient indicated after being pressed for juice/oil. It is a byproduct of the cider industry and inexpensive compared to fresh fruits/vegetables. Capable of providing added benefits however unnecessary.

Blueberries – A great fruit that is high in antioxidants. In cat food to make the food appear healthier. Cats don’t have a need for blueberries. It’s just as likely they won’t provide any benefits.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


Wysong
Nurture

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Chicken Meal, Fish Meal, Turkey Meal, Brown Rice, Peas, Pea Protein, Chicken Fat (preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Flaxseeds, Beet Pulp, Eggs, Montmorillonite Clay, Crab Meal, Sesame Seeds, Whey, Natural Chicken and Fish Flavor, Salt, Calcium Carbonate, Colostrum, Tomato Pomace, Calcium Propionate, Taurine, Choline Chloride, Organic Barley Grass, Blueberry, Kelp, Yogurt, Citric Acid, Apple Pectin, Fish Oil, Yeast Extract, Mixed Tocopherols, Rosemary Extract, Chicory Root, Hemicellulose Extract, Yeast Culture, Carrots, Celery, Beets, Parsley, Lettuce, Watercress, Spinach, Minerals (Potassium Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Copper Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate), Vitamins (Ascorbic Acid [source of Vitamin C], Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid), Dried Bacillus licheniformis Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Pepper.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Chicken Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of chicken. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Fish Meal - The dried rendered ‘meat’ and bone of fish. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and ‘meat’ without the bone. If a fish is named, then the meal is made from the named fish. A more concentration source of protein, yet mercury levels are a concern.

Turkey Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of turkey. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Brown Rice - Hulled, whole grain rice. It is considered healthier than white rice and corn. Brown rice is still hard for a cat digest. Still considered a filler ingredient.

Ingredients to Point Out

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Fish/Seafood - Fish have elevated levels of mercury. Feeding a cat fish every now and then is okay. Long term exposure to fish will cause health problems. Also, the majority of the time fish used for pet food is rank and of poor quality. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption'. This applies to seafood as well.

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Non-Meat Protein – This refers to protein extracted particularly from non-meat sources, this includes pea and potato protein amongst others. These ingredients have a low biological value. The protein from these sources simply cannot be used effectively by cats, as this protein lacks essential amino acids the cat needs.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Egg/Egg product – The biggest concern regarding egg ingredients is the quality of eggs used in pet food formulas. Usually it is egg waste. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption.'

Montmorillonite Clay -There is not enough research and facts about this ingredient in cat food. Certain types of this clay may not be pure, or free from dioxins. Dioxins are harmful. The FDA recommends that this clay be tested before being used in cat foods. It is a recommendation however, not a requirement.

Pomace – Pomace is the remains (skin, seeds, pulp) of whatever ingredient indicated after being pressed for juice/oil. It is a byproduct of the cider industry and inexpensive compared to fresh fruits/vegetables. Capable of providing added benefits however unnecessary.

Blueberries – A great fruit that is high in antioxidants. In cat food to make the food appear healthier. Cats don’t have a need for blueberries. It’s just as likely they won’t provide any benefits.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


Wysong
Nurture with Quail

 

Ingredients

Quail, Chicken, Chicken Meal, Fish Meal, Turkey Meal, Brown Rice, Peas, Pea Protein, Chicken Fat (preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Flaxseeds, Dried Plain Beet Pulp, Eggs, Natural Flavor, Crab Meal, Sesame Seeds, Whey, Montmorillonite Clay, Salt, Calcium Carbonate, Colostrum, Tomato Pomace, Calcium Propionate, Taurine, Choline Chloride, Coconut Oil, Organic Barley Grass, Blueberry, Dried Kelp, Yogurt, Citric Acid, Apple Pectin, Fish Oil, Yeast Extract, Mixed Tocopherols, Rosemary Extract, Chicory Root, Hemicellulose Extract, Yeast Culture, Carrots, Celery, Parsley, Lettuce, Watercress, Spinach, Minerals (Potassium Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Copper Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate), Vitamins (Ascorbic Acid [source of Vitamin C], Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid), Dried Bacillus licheniformis Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Pepper.

First 5 ingredients

Quail – Mid-sized bird. A unique protein source not commonly seen in cat food. Quail is arguably more beneficial than chicken.

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Chicken Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of chicken. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Fish Meal - The dried rendered ‘meat’ and bone of fish. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and ‘meat’ without the bone. If a fish is named, then the meal is made from the named fish. A more concentration source of protein, yet mercury levels are a concern.

Turkey Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of turkey. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Ingredients to Point Out

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Fish/Seafood - Fish have elevated levels of mercury. Feeding a cat fish every now and then is okay. Long term exposure to fish will cause health problems. Also, the majority of the time fish used for pet food is rank and of poor quality. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption'. This applies to seafood as well.

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Non-Meat Protein – This refers to protein extracted particularly from non-meat sources, this includes pea and potato protein amongst others. These ingredients have a low biological value. The protein from these sources simply cannot be used effectively by cats, as this protein lacks essential amino acids the cat needs.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Egg/Egg product – The biggest concern regarding egg ingredients is the quality of eggs used in pet food formulas. Usually it is egg waste. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption.'

Montmorillonite Clay -There is not enough research and facts about this ingredient in cat food. Certain types of this clay may not be pure, or free from dioxins. Dioxins are harmful. The FDA recommends that this clay be tested before being used in cat foods. It is a recommendation however, not a requirement.

Pomace – Pomace is the remains (skin, seeds, pulp) of whatever ingredient indicated after being pressed for juice/oil. It is a byproduct of the cider industry and inexpensive compared to fresh fruits/vegetables. Capable of providing added benefits however unnecessary.

Blueberries – A great fruit that is high in antioxidants. In cat food to make the food appear healthier. Cats don’t have a need for blueberries. It’s just as likely they won’t provide any benefits.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


Wysong
Optimal Vitality

 

Ingredients

Organic Chicken, Chicken Meal, Fish Meal, Turkey Meal, Pea Protein, Potato Protein, Peas, Chicken Fat (preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Flaxseeds, Beet Pulp, Eggs, Montmorillonite Clay, Crab Meal, Sesame Seeds, Whey, Natural Chicken and Fish Flavor, Coconut Oil, Chia Seeds, Salt, Calcium Carbonate, Tomato Pomace, Calcium Propionate, Taurine, Choline Chloride, Organic Barley Grass, Blueberry, Kelp, Yogurt, Apple Pectin, Fish Oil, Yeast Extract, Citric Acid, Chicory Root, Hemicellulose Extract, Mixed Tocopherols, Rosemary Extract, Yeast Culture, Carrots, Celery, Beets, Parsley, Lettuce, Watercress, Spinach, Minerals (Potassium Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Copper Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate), Vitamins (Ascorbic Acid [source of Vitamin C], Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid), Dried Bacillus licheniformis Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Pepper.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Chicken Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of chicken. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Fish Meal - The dried rendered ‘meat’ and bone of fish. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and ‘meat’ without the bone. If a fish is named, then the meal is made from the named fish. A more concentration source of protein, yet mercury levels are a concern.

Turkey Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of turkey. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Pea Protein – Protein extracted from the yellow pea. It is protein from a non-animal source, providing little to no nutrition.

Ingredients to Point Out

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Fish/Seafood - Fish have elevated levels of mercury. Feeding a cat fish every now and then is okay. Long term exposure to fish will cause health problems. Also, the majority of the time fish used for pet food is rank and of poor quality. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption'. This applies to seafood as well.

Non-Meat Protein – This refers to protein extracted particularly from non-meat sources, this includes pea and potato protein amongst others. These ingredients have a low biological value. The protein from these sources simply cannot be used effectively by cats, as this protein lacks essential amino acids the cat needs.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Egg/Egg product – The biggest concern regarding egg ingredients is the quality of eggs used in pet food formulas. Usually it is egg waste. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption.'

Montmorillonite Clay -There is not enough research and facts about this ingredient in cat food. Certain types of this clay may not be pure, or free from dioxins. Dioxins are harmful. The FDA recommends that this clay be tested before being used in cat foods. It is a recommendation however, not a requirement.

Pomace – Pomace is the remains (skin, seeds, pulp) of whatever ingredient indicated after being pressed for juice/oil. It is a byproduct of the cider industry and inexpensive compared to fresh fruits/vegetables. Capable of providing added benefits however unnecessary.

Blueberries – A great fruit that is high in antioxidants. In cat food to make the food appear healthier. Cats don’t have a need for blueberries. It’s just as likely they won’t provide any benefits.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


Wysong
Uretic

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Chicken Meal, Meat Protein Isolate, Potato Protein, Brown Rice, Peas, Chicken Fat (preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Flaxseeds, Dried Plain Beet Pulp, Natural Flavor, Sesame Seeds, Cheese, Eggs, Whey, DL-Methionine, Salt, Calcium Carbonate, Tomato Pomace, Calcium Propionate, Cranberry Extract, Taurine, Choline Chloride, Coconut Oil, Organic Barley Grass, Blueberry, Dried Kelp, Yogurt, Citric Acid, Apple Pectin, Fish Oil, Yeast Extract, Mixed Tocopherols, Rosemary Extract, Chicory Root, Hemicellulose Extract, Yeast Culture, Carrots, Celery, Parsley, Lettuce, Watercress, Spinach, Minerals (Potassium Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Copper Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate), Vitamins (Ascorbic Acid [source of Vitamin C], Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid), Dried Bacillus licheniformis Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Pepper.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Chicken Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of chicken. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Meat Protein Isolate -The protein extracted from meat. Isolate is more pure than concentrate as isolate has both carbohydrates and fiber removed.

Potato Protein – The protein from potatoes. This is protein from a vegetable source.

Brown Rice - Hulled, whole grain rice. It is considered healthier than white rice and corn. Brown rice is still hard for a cat digest. Still considered a filler ingredient.

Ingredients to Point Out

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Non-Meat Protein – This refers to protein extracted particularly from non-meat sources, this includes pea and potato protein amongst others. These ingredients have a low biological value. The protein from these sources simply cannot be used effectively by cats, as this protein lacks essential amino acids the cat needs.

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Egg/Egg product – The biggest concern regarding egg ingredients is the quality of eggs used in pet food formulas. Usually it is egg waste. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption.'

Pomace – Pomace is the remains (skin, seeds, pulp) of whatever ingredient indicated after being pressed for juice/oil. It is a byproduct of the cider industry and inexpensive compared to fresh fruits/vegetables. Capable of providing added benefits however unnecessary.

Blueberries – A great fruit that is high in antioxidants. In cat food to make the food appear healthier. Cats don’t have a need for blueberries. It’s just as likely they won’t provide any benefits.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


Wysong
Vegan

 

Ingredients

Brown Rice, Corn, Corn Protein, Extruded Soybeans, Potato Protein, Soybean Oil, Flaxseeds, Molasses, Peas, Dicalcium Phosphate, Montmorillonite Clay, Sesame Seeds, Salt, Coconut Oil, Taurine, Lysine, L-Tryptophan, Choline Chloride, L-Carnitine, Chia Seeds, Rice Bran Oil, Calcium Propionate, Dried Kelp, Organic Barley Grass, Blueberry, Citric Acid, Apple Pectin, Yeast Extract, Mixed Tocopherols, Rosemary Extract, Chicory Root, Hemicellulose Extract, Yeast Culture, Carrots, Celery, Beets, Parsley, Lettuce, Watercress, Spinach, Minerals (Potassium Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Copper Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate), Calcium Carbonate, Vitamins (Ascorbic Acid [source of Vitamin C], Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid), Dried Bacillus licheniformis Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Pepper.

First 5 ingredients

Brown Rice - Hulled, whole grain rice. It is considered healthier than white rice and corn. Brown rice is still hard for a cat digest. Still considered a filler ingredient.

Corn -This is a large grain plant that is widely popular in pet foods.

Corn Protein – Protein extracted from maize, which is corn. It is high in protein, but it is protein that cats cannot use effectively.

Extruded Soybeans – These are soybeans that have gone through the extrusion process. Soy based ingredients are not good. This ingredient is filler.

Potato Protein – The protein from potatoes. This is protein from a vegetable source.

Ingredients to Point Out

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Corn based ingredients – Corn, especially, is hard to digest and a source of allergies, and health problems. Corn starch, while not corn, is corn based and is an unneeded source of carbohydrates. Protein (corn gluten) from corn is not appropriate as cats are carnivores. Corn based ingredients should be avoided if possible.

Legumes – This includes lentils, chickpeas (aka garbanzo beans), soybeans, or any other bean. The growing trend is to include legumes in cat food labeled as grain free, which is similar to fruits and vegetables. Legumes provide bulk and a source of carbohydrates. It makes the food appear healthier as opposed to seeing grains however legumes are unnecessary. While for these reviews, peas are under the category of vegetables, peas are also considered a legume.

Non-Meat Protein – This refers to protein extracted particularly from non-meat sources, this includes pea and potato protein amongst others. These ingredients have a low biological value. The protein from these sources simply cannot be used effectively by cats, as this protein lacks essential amino acids the cat needs.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Montmorillonite Clay -There is not enough research and facts about this ingredient in cat food. Certain types of this clay may not be pure, or free from dioxins. Dioxins are harmful. The FDA recommends that this clay be tested before being used in cat foods. It is a recommendation however, not a requirement.

Blueberries – A great fruit that is high in antioxidants. In cat food to make the food appear healthier. Cats don’t have a need for blueberries. It’s just as likely they won’t provide any benefits.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


Wysong
Vitality

 

Ingredients

Chicken, Chicken Meal, Fish Meal, Turkey Meal, Brown Rice, Peas, Potato Protein, Chicken Fat, Flaxseeds, Dried Plain Beet Pulp, Eggs, Montmorillonite Clay, Natural Flavor, Crab Meal, Sesame Seeds, Whey, Salt, Calcium Carbonate, Tomato Pomace, Calcium Propionate, Taurine, Choline Chloride, Coconut Oil, Organic Barley Grass, Blueberry, Dried Kelp, Yogurt (Whey, Milk Solids, Yogurt Cultures), Citric Acid, Apple Pectin, Fish Oil, Yeast Extract, Mixed Tocopherols, Rosemary Extract, Chicory Root, Hemicellulose Extract, Yeast Culture, Carrots, Celery, Parsley, Lettuce, Watercress, Spinach, Minerals (Potassium Chloride, Zinc Proteinate, Zinc Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Iron Proteinate, Copper Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate), Vitamins (Ascorbic Acid [source of Vitamin C], Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid), Dried Bacillus licheniformis Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus plantarum Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Pepper.

First 5 ingredients

Chicken – Meat, skin, and bone of chicken. About 70% moisture therefore is always seen near the top of ingredients lists. After cooking, the chicken loses most of its moisture as well as protein. A common ingredient found in cat food.

Chicken Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of chicken. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Fish Meal - The dried rendered ‘meat’ and bone of fish. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and ‘meat’ without the bone. If a fish is named, then the meal is made from the named fish. A more concentration source of protein, yet mercury levels are a concern.

Turkey Meal - The dried rendered skin, meat, and bone of turkey. This excludes the head, feet, and intestines. If the ingredients list states ‘boneless’ than the meal is skin and meat without the bone. A more concentration source of protein.

Brown Rice - Hulled, whole grain rice. It is considered healthier than white rice and corn. Brown rice is still hard for a cat digest. Still considered a filler ingredient.

Ingredients to Point Out

Meals – Meals are a concentrated source of protein, more so than actual meat like chicken, turkey, etc. Sometimes up to 50% more protein. The concern with meals over regular meat is that meals can legally contain the ‘4Ds.’ This means dead, diseased, dying, and disabled animals.

Fish/Seafood - Fish have elevated levels of mercury. Feeding a cat fish every now and then is okay. Long term exposure to fish will cause health problems. Also, the majority of the time fish used for pet food is rank and of poor quality. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption'. This applies to seafood as well.

Whole Grains – Whole grains are considered healthier than grain. They are easier for a cat to digest. That being said, they are still a grain. Grains are not needed in a cat’s diet. Therefore, even though they are healthier they are still not needed in cat food. It is still a filler ingredient.

Vegetables - Vegetables are normally used as a binder and carbohydrate substitute. A grain free cat food could still have a high amount of carbohydrates. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, etc., while not grains, still contain carbohydrates.

Non-Meat Protein – This refers to protein extracted particularly from non-meat sources, this includes pea and potato protein amongst others. These ingredients have a low biological value. The protein from these sources simply cannot be used effectively by cats, as this protein lacks essential amino acids the cat needs.

Fiber – The jury is still out as to whether ingredients like pea and potato fiber, beet pulp (which doesn't contain the sugar) are bad or good. They are bolded here just to quickly point out both sides of the story. On one hand, the argument can be made that these are cheap fiber sources that do more harm than good. On the other hand, fiber (both insoluble and soluble, fermentable and non-fermentable) has many benefits that shouldn't be overlooked. Too much of one type of fiber is where problems may occur. Each cat reacts differently.

Egg/Egg product – The biggest concern regarding egg ingredients is the quality of eggs used in pet food formulas. Usually it is egg waste. Unless otherwise stated by the company as 'food fit for human consumption.'

Montmorillonite Clay -There is not enough research and facts about this ingredient in cat food. Certain types of this clay may not be pure, or free from dioxins. Dioxins are harmful. The FDA recommends that this clay be tested before being used in cat foods. It is a recommendation however, not a requirement.

Pomace – Pomace is the remains (skin, seeds, pulp) of whatever ingredient indicated after being pressed for juice/oil. It is a byproduct of the cider industry and inexpensive compared to fresh fruits/vegetables. Capable of providing added benefits however unnecessary.

Blueberries – A great fruit that is high in antioxidants. In cat food to make the food appear healthier. Cats don’t have a need for blueberries. It’s just as likely they won’t provide any benefits.

Copper Sulfate – Is an irritant and is linked to copper toxicity. Many do not like the presence of this ingredient in cat food because it has many other uses. It can be found in the leather, wood, battery, ink, paint, and metal industries.

Sodium Selenite - Many cat owners are concerned about this ingredient. It is a cheaper form of selenium and is linked with selenium toxicity. This is because ingredients such as fish, meat, and grains already contain selenium naturally. Therefore the addition of sodium selenite just adds more selenium to the formula. For what it is worth, a study has shown sodium selenite is no more harmful than natural sources of selenium.

Overall Score


WET
Go to Epigen Canned Beef
Go to Epigen Canned Chicken
Go to Epigen Canned Duck
Go to Epigen Canned Rabbit
Go to Epigen Canned Salmon
Go to Epigen Canned Turkey
Go to Uretic with Organic Chicken
DRY
Go to Anergen
Go to Epigen
Go to Epigen 90
Go to Fundamentals
Go to Geriatrx
Go to Nurture
Go to Nurture with Quail
Go to Optimal Vitality
Go to Uretic
Go to Vegan
Go to Vitality


Be Sociable, Share!
Best Cat Food for Cats © Copyright 2017 Frontier Theme